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Hands and Fingers​ ​ ​
Penis Object Mouth Anus Vulva/Vagina Hands and Fingers

Activity:

Touching or stroking the penis and/or scrotum and squeezing the testicles can be pleasurable. This is a type of masturbation.

 

Risks:

There is a risk of pregnancy with mutual masturbation, if sperm is transferred to a vagina from someone's hands or fingers. There is also a risk of catching an STI with mutual masturbation between genitals, if one partner is infected.

 

How to make it safe:

Make sure hands are cleaned, before and after. Can use lubricant and latex gloves, especially if one partner has warts on their hands.

Activity:

Explore the feel of different objects, sharing the experience with partners.

 

Risks:

There are minimal risks associated with this activity.

 

How to make it safe:

Make sure hands and products are clean.

Activity:

The mouth, hands and fingers are all very sensitive. Kissing the hands and fingers, stroking the lips or sucking fingers can all be a pleasurable part of sex.

 

Risks:

If someone has the cold sore virus (Herpes simplex 1) on their mouth then there is a small risk of passing the virus on if masturbating genitals after touch a mouth.

 

How to make it safe:

Make sure you have clean hands keep finger nails trimmed.

Activity:

You can touch, stroke or insert finger(s) into the anus (masturbation). Some people gradually insert the whole hand (fisting).

 

Risks:

It's not common for STI's to be spread this way. However, if there are any cuts or sores on the fingers or hands, the risk of passing on or getting HIV or other blood-borne infections such as hepatitis B or C increases.

 

How to make it safe:

Use water based lubricant as the anus does not produce moisture. You can get free water based lubricant from the sexual health service.

Activity:

You can touch, stroke or insert fingers (s) into the vagina (masturbation). The external clitoris is a very sensitive part of the vulva and can be pleasured by direct touch.

 

Risks:

There is a risk of pregnancy with mutual masturbation, if sperm is transferred to a vagina from someone's hands or fingers. There is also a risk of catching an STI with mutual masturbation between genitals, if one partner is infected.

 

 

How to make it safe:

Make sure hands are cleaned, before and after. Can use lubricant and latex gloves, especially if one partner has warts on their hands.

Activity:

Holding hands can be a great way of expressing your feelings about your partner. Touching, stroking and massaging the hands and wrists can be sensual and pleasurable.

 

Risks:

There are no risks associated with this activity.

 

 

Vulva/Vagina​ ​ ​ ​

Activity:

Often called 'vaginal sex'. You can also rub the vulva against the penis without penetration.

 

Risks:

If a condom is not used, there's a risk of pregnancy and passing on STI's. Even if the man doesn't ejaculate in to the vagina, these are still the risks because infections and sperm are present in 'pre-come'.

 

How to make it safe:

Use male or female condoms with water based lubricant. Contraception, such as the pill or the implant, prevent unintended pregnancies occurring, but condoms will prevent both this and STI's.

Activity:

The vulva can be pleasured by using objects against the external clitoris and labia or inside the vagina.

 

Risks:

Sharing sex toys has risks, including getting and passing on infections. If there are any cuts or sores around the vagina, anus or penis and there's blood, there's an increased risk of passing on hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV.

 

How to make it safe:

Keeping objects clean ensures there is low risk of infections being passed on, or using condoms, changing these when changing partner or orifice.

Activity:

Often referred to as 'oral sex' or 'cunnilingus'. It is pleasurable for some people to give and received oral sex. You can explore the vulva with the tongue and lips by kissing, sucking and licking the clitoris, labia and vaginal opening.

 

Risks:

There's a risk of getting or passing on STIs if you're giving or receiving oral sex. The risk increases if either of you has sores or cuts around the mouth or vagina.

This is because viruses and bacteria, which may be present in semen, vaginal fluid or blood, can travel more easily into a partner's body through breaks in the skin.

Generally, the risk of infection is lower when you receive oral sex than when you give someone oral sex. However, it is still possible for STIs to be passed on.

 

 

How to make it safe:

Using dental dams over the vulva/vagina.

Activity:

Pushing and rubbing vulva and anus together can be pleasurable for some people. The external clitoris can be stimulated this way.

 

Risks:

If there are any infections present on the vulva or anus, there is a risk infection.

 

How to make it safe:

There are no barrier methods to protect in this sort of activity, such a dams or condoms. However, regular STI screening will allow you and your partner to know if you have any infections and can be treated if there are any. This would minimise risk or passing anything on. If there is a viral outbreak, such as warts or herpes, refrain from this activity.

Activity:

Often called 'scissoring' and can be pleasurable to touch, rub and grind vulvas against each other, either clothed or when naked. The external clitorises can touch each other in this position.

 

Risks:

If there are any infections present on the vulva, there is a risk infection.

 

How to make it safe:

There are no barrier methods to protect in this sort of activity, such a dams or condoms. However, regular STI screening will allow you and your partner to know if you have any infections and can be treated if there are any. This would minimise risk or passing anything on. If there is a viral outbreak, such as warts or herpes, refrain from this activity.

 
Anus​ ​ ​ ​

Activity:

Often called 'anal sex', this can be pleasurable for both the person inserting their penis and the person 'receiving' the penis in their anus. The internal clitoris and/or prostate gland can be stimulating through this kind of sex.

 

Risks:

Anal sex has a higher risk of spreading STIs than many other types of sexual activity. This is because the lining of the anus is thin and can easily be damaged, which makes it more vulnerable to infection.

 

How to make it safe:

Use male condoms with water based lubricant.

Activity:

The anus can be pleasured by placing objects next to the anus or inside it.

 

Risks:

Sharing sex toys has risks, including getting and passing on infections. If there are any cuts or sores around the vagina, anus or penis and there's blood, there's an increased risk of passing on hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV.

 

How to make it safe:

Keeping objects clean ensures there is low risk of infections being passed on, or using condoms, changing these when changing partner or orifice.

Activity:

'Oral sex' or 'rimming'. It can be pleasurable for some people to experience giving and receiving oral sex to the anus. You can explore the anus with the tongue and lips by kissing, sucking and licking the area.

 

Risks:

There's a risk of getting or passing on STIs if you're giving or receiving oral sex. The risk increases if either of you has sores or cuts around the mouth or vagina.

This is because viruses and bacteria, which may be present in semen, vaginal fluid or blood, can travel more easily into a partner's body through breaks in the skin.

Generally, the risk of infection is lower when you receive oral sex than when you give someone oral sex. However, it is still possible for STIs to be passed on.

 

How to make it safe:

Using dentals dams over the anus.

Activity:

Direct anus-anus contact may be difficult to achieve but pushing anuses towards each other and buttocks against each other can be pleasurable.

 

Risks:

If there are any infections present on the anus, there is a risk infection.

 

How to make it safe:

There are no barrier methods to protect in this sort of activity, such a dams or condoms. However, regular STI screening will allow you and your partner to know if you have any infections and can be treated if there are any. This would minimise risk or passing anything on. If there is a viral outbreak, such as warts or herpes, refrain from this activity.

 
Mouth ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

Activity:

'Oral sex' or 'blowjob'. It can be pleasurable for some people to give and receive oral sex to a penis. This may involve kissing, licking and sucking the penis and testicles.

 

Risks:

There's a risk of getting or passing on STIs if you're giving or receiving oral sex. The risk increases if either of you has sores or cuts around the mouth or vagina.

This is because viruses and bacteria, which may be present in semen, vaginal fluid or blood, can travel more easily into a partner's body through breaks in the skin.

Generally, the risk of infection is lower when you receive oral sex than when you give someone oral sex. However, it is still possible for STIs to be passed on.

 

How to make it safe:

Flavoured condoms are designed for oral sex, make sure a new condom is used if moving from oral sex to penetration.

Activity:

Use different foods or exploring different shapes with the tongue. Having oral sex with an object or sex toy can be pleasurable and arousing. Different textures, flavours and shapes can give sexual stimulation to all the people involved.

 

Risks:

There are minimal risks associated with this activity. If sharing objects between mouths, then there is a risk of the cold sore virus (herpes simplex 1) being transmitted.

 

How to make it safe:

Make sure objects are cleaned when changing partners or orifices.

Activity:

Kissing can be pleasurable and can be an important part of arousal. There are many way to explore the mouth including using your tongue and lips to suck, lick and kiss another person's mouth.

 

Risks:

If one partner has the cold sore virus (herpes simplex 1) then there is a risk of transmission through kissing.

 

How to make it safe:

Refrain from kissing before or during an outbreak.

 
Object ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

Activity:

The penis can be pleasured by rubbing against different textured surfaces and changes in temperature. Masturbating products can be bought. People experiment by putting their penis into these objects or by draping or wrapping their penis with sensual objects such as scarves or cushions.

 

Risks:

Sharing sex toys has risks, including getting and passing on infections such as chlamydia, syphilis and herpes. If there are any cuts or sores around the  penis and there's blood, there's an increased risk of passing on hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV.

 

How to make it safe:

Make sure penis and objects are clean before and after use.

 
Penis ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

Activity:

It can be enjoyable to rub penises together, put a penis into another foreskin (sometimes called docking), or masturbates penises together. You could also have sex where two, or more penises can come into contact.

 

Risks:

There is a risk of transmission of STI's in docking or mutual masturbation. There is also a risk of tears in the flesh.

 

How to make it safe:

Use condoms, wash hands between masturbating. Lubricant would also help to make these activities more comfortable and safe.

 

 

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